RETURNING

Leaves drop and return to earth,

water cycles

back and forth, visible

as raindrops, then

not. Energy curls

inward.

The slow fade of Fall.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Photos taken in and around Seattle, Washington. We’ve had the rainiest October on record this year. It’s great for the mountain snowpack, but….

SPRING, in BLACK and WHITE

Staring down at water lily leaves after rain…

Surely it’s spring, even without green!

For some people, especially those struggling with depression or those who lost a loved one at this time of year, spring can be a hard season. Someone whose personal world is drained of color and hope can feel even more alienated by all the renewal and rejoicing going on.

So this is a reminder to be aware of people nearby who may be struggling, and to allow them their space – and maybe to gently suggest that a world seemingly drained of color can have it’s own beauty.

And it’s temporary, everything is.

Many images of Spring that may strike your fancy: WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.

NOSTALGIA

Nostalgic moments can arise inexplicably, leaving you wondering why this particular scene drew you back into a foggy pool of nostalgic associations.

An old truck,

parked on a Seattle street on a cold winter day –

the electric wires overhead, the blue sky and soft clouds,

the wet pavement and

luminous light merge,

evoking a familiar but inchoate feeling.

A recognition,

re-seeing.

———-

Road trips evoke nostalgia, and also the familiar roads

traveled dozens of times from home to work and back again,

their curves and hills

lodged in my muscles

like a dance.

A fall rain shower washes out the details, and

the well-traveled path transports me

to a vaguely nostalgic place.

A place located in my mind and outside it –

here and now, time expands

through being

in a particular place.

A foggy window on a winter morning

is the softly translucentĀ  backdrop

for buds promising spring. Suddenly

I’m nostalgic for everything green and

warm and

pushing past barriers – the whole gestalt of

springs past and future,

is evoked by tiny, frail buds

holding their own against

winter’s stubborn grays.

Through the car window,

glowing in evening light, a bouquet

of summer:

Queen Ann’s Lace, White Sweet Clover, Honeysuckle…

their fragrance, their familiar names,

gathered again

from roadside waste places that I’ve memorized

over the years…

A petal

falls

onto an old book.

Oozing nostalgia, it’s sepia pages provide

a pleasurable half

hour

on a summer

afternoon.

I might sit here to read,

but

this nostalgia is borrowed.

I took the picture at an estate sale in a Connecticut seaside town..

White

cotton curtains

floating

on a summer breeze;

the window screen

has

a small tear or two.

Flowers hide.

Another window screen,

another home – this screen

catching early spring raindrops.

As a child I gazed out windows,

shifting

my focus back and forth

between the details

of tiny screen grids –

and the big, beckoning outdoors,

far

beyond.

A nostalgia of rainy roads:

always

the movement, the shimmering movement across space,

and through time,

until the membranes separating locations and times are thoroughly soaked

and dissolved

into nostalgia.

MVC-862Fc

***

Take a look at this week’s Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge, overflowing with nostalgia.

APP

A few days ago I downloaded an Android app called Photogrid. It puts your phone photos into collages.

A shake of the phone produces a new arrangement (you pick frame styles & colors) –

Here’s a grid of road trips in the Pacific Northwest:

Here’s another arrangement of the same images:

This one is a mash-up of

Buddhas,

flora,

rain on the car window (near Seattle of course)

a hand,

and street shots in New York & Seattle:

I don’t think you can change the placement of the images by dragging them around – that would be even better.

But sometimes random choices produce juxtapositions you wouldn’t have thought of, and they’re really nice –

(yes, John Cage figured that out long ago).

I think I like this one best:

And the app is free!

Falling

Down, down, down…

But

so

lovely, even

in

their

demise…

Or especially so.

Photos taken in Bellevue, Port Angeles, and up on Hurricane Ridge on the Olympic Peninsula, all in Washington.