WATERSIDE, WINTER

The weather has quieted.

A parade of typical winter days and nights

plods through the month,

not terribly cold, certainly not warm,

some sun, lots of clouds,

rain that comes and goes.

The weather doesn’t keep me indoors but

I have to push myself more than I would in spring

when wildflowers pique my curiosity, propelling me outside

day after miraculous day.

But in this dimmer season, devoid of birdsong,

I can’t complain.

There’s plenty to see –

small bits to stumble across,

wide views where the soul can rest,

modest miracles, startling finds,

refreshment

each time I venture outside.

*

1. Our life-giving sun is setting in the west over the Salish Sea, illuminating the Deception Pass bridge.

2. A broken blade of Bullwhip kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) lies on the beach where the outgoing tide left it (for me?). This giant seaweed is an alga that reproduces by way of spores, not flowers. From a tiny spore, it reaches 30 – 100 feet (10 – 30 m) in less than a year. Then it dies and pieces wash ashore all winter, like this one.
3. The prolific Bull kelp is found from central California to Alaska’s Aleutian Islands in cold, fairly deep water. A root-like holdfast anchors it to the seafloor. Near the water’s surface, the stipe (like a stem) widens into a hollow, bulb-like float that contains gas, allowing the blades (like leaves) to float near the surface and gather sunlight for photosynthesis.
.
4. Winter storms have left countless pieces of kelp on the beaches. This one nuzzles up to a fragment of Sea lettuce (Ulva lactuca).

*

*

6. A lone figure stands on the rocks (in the middle) enjoying a cloud-laden sunset view of the Olympic Mountain Range, 60 miles (96km) to the southwest.

7. A Bullwhip kelp stipe floats on the gentle waves of an outgoing tide.
8. A hieroglyphic kelp bed viewed from a rocky promontory called Rosario Head that juts out into the rich waters of the Salish Sea.
9. These Bullwhip kelp blades are still attached to the stipe. When the tide comes back in, where will the kelp go?
10.
11. King tides and winter storms have pushed heavy driftwood logs into an old Sitka spruce tree (Picea sitchensis). Every time I pass this tree I wonder how much longer until the tides undercut its shallow roots enough to make it lean and finally fall. Like Bullwhip kelp, Sitka spruce ranges along the American west coast from southern Alaska, through Washington and Oregon, to northern California. Bullwhip kelp is a very large alga; likewise, the Sitka spruce is a very large tree. One Sitka spruce, named the Queets spruce, lives on the other side of the mountains seen above in #6 and is around 250′ (76m) tall. In Canada, the Carmanah Giant is much taller, at over 314 ft (96m).
As Sitka spruce trees and Bullwhip kelp coexist in this bountiful region, pieces of kelp wash ashore to rest at the foot of this spruce tree, or even in its lower branches. And perhaps spruce needles blow across the water to land atop a bed of kelp. While Sitka spruce trees can live to 700 years, Bullwhip kelp completes its life cycle in less than a year, but both depend on the grand cycle of the rolling earth, soaking up the sun and resting in the dark of each new day.
12. Bits of shell, rock, wood, plants, and who knows what else: a pleasing puzzle found on a nearby beach.
13. The tide rolled two logs onto the old boat launch. They’ve been there for weeks. I like the formal simplicity of repeating parallel lines.
14.
15. The old pier in the distance also suffers the insults of storms and high tides. A few days ago workers began to dismantle it. The plan is to slowly allow this bay to return to the form it had before people built a fish hatchery here back in the 1940s. It is well on its way.
16.
17.

***


99 comments

  1. ‘Modest miracles’ and ‘refreshment’, that’s how we perceive January, like you, dear Lynn.
    I especially like all that wood and warm light in most of the photos. It is winter still, undoubtedly, but warmer times are already greeting behind horizon.
    The bull kelp you often show us is a fascinating, archaic seeming … being, plant, sea vegetable … strange and impressing anyway. No wonder you need to take its pictures over and over again. It always brings that parallel line structure you mention in No.13 – if only in twos – by its curving edges.
    Thank you for this beautiful series, it will spare me a walk of my own, because there is never ending rain and stormy wind today. Better to watch that from inside the house.

    Liked by 4 people

    • The afternoons have been filled with warm light lately, at least when the sun peeks through the clouds. And since I tend to be at the computer in the morning, late afternoon is when I’m most likely to be outside, enjoying the views from the west side of the island. I like your idea that the kelp has an archaic look. Yes, it’s very primitive. If you saw it in person it would be even more so, because it’s so big. I think one thing that attracts me to it is the open, sweeping curves it often makes. Maybe by now the rain is finished and you can get out again…I hope so. Thanks for your empathy (you always seem to understand me) and interest (you always contribute new ideas), Ule. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 3 people

    • And thank you very much for stopping by and commenting. I can see how #6 might bring back memories of Deception Pass. We live less than 10 minutes away from it now but I grew up on the east coast. I didn’t come out here until a life-changing vacation in 2011. Maybe you’ll get back someday but if not, feel free to browse this blog, which is full of photographs from Deception Pass. Have a good week.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Your first shot of the bridge emerging out of darkness into the light, is lovely and somehow very poignant. The logs on the ribbed boat launch are pleasing and immediately encourage me to grate some cinnamon onto my toast this morning, thank you for a nice album and good idea about the toast.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Good morning, dear Lynn,
    we really like your pictures, they are like graphics.
    We love winter because it creates such clarity in nature.
    Keep healthy and happy
    The Fab Four of Cley
    πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

    Liked by 4 people

  4. It is similar with us.
    Nevertheless, I was outside on 26 of 30 January days so far.
    One actually discovers many new things and even if the light is missing most of the time, the nevertheless obtained photos are special. Of mushrooms, early bloomers, of lonely trees, of puddles and passing things of all kinds.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. 8
    a really great pic.
    We had a discussion lately if there is something like true art in nature. Structures on some stones, wood and so on.
    I said, that human art usually “adds something” to those structures.
    This one here seems to be different. But an human beining, an artist, would keep a distance from the edge

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for this generous string of reactions and comments, Gerhard. I like your idea about #16. The response to #13 is great! Regarding the broken shells on the beach, we don’t see very much glass or plastic but I’ve noticed more in the last two months, probably because we’ve had big storms. I do see the snake in the driftwood. Kelp does change color after it’s on land and of course, the light is different every day. Plus I like to play around a little when I process the photos! πŸ˜‰
      You have been out so much! That’s wonderful and it encourages me. Your list of things seen outside – mushrooms, etc. – is very poetic. Thank you, and I hope you have a pleasant week.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Graham, thank you for reminding me! I like these turning points very much. Love that Celtic heritage. Halfway, and it feels like it here. I didn’t remember the name for this time. Looked it up and read that it translates to in the belly of the mother, i.e. seeds beginning to stir underground. Nice.
      I like the slow springs we have. There are already little green sprouts here and there, and a House finch was singing today (in spite of what I wrote above). But it’s all very drawn out because we don’t warm up quickly, unlike many US east coast locations. Maybe your seasonal change is similar?

      Liked by 1 person

      • I only recently discovered the name for it…

        Midpoints between the ‘turning’ points in the eternal cycle…

        There are signs here too – some buds to be seen. And yes, I think the change is gradual here as well, modulated, of course, by the predictably unpredictable short-term weather fluctuations. I am sure the underlying trend curve must be smooth – doesn’t seem like it sometimes though when you live everyday experience up close to its edge.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Another pleasant scroll through a number of nice images. I’m especially fond of that dark curl of wood (#10) and I think your wide aperture in this instance creates a wonderful intimacy in those shadows.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. I like to imagine that the forces of nature direct the algae, the trunks and other beautiful details to that area, because they already know that there is a photographer who walks around and takes fabulous photographs of these natural elements.
    And that still accompanies these photographs with sensitive words, poems, and so on…

    I love the words, the photos and that golden tone that illuminates them!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh, you make me laugh, Dulce, what a nice idea. Maybe there is a nature traffic director out there who says “Go that way, someone wants to see you!” It’s very good to hear that you enjoy the words as well as the images and the idea of a golden tone running through it all is really quite wonderful. I hope you have a good week – don’t work too hard!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. What beautiful light you have found in #1. I like that the reflection is somewhat distorted. I’m so glad you don’t take the bullwhip kelp for granted, as I’m sure other people do, guessing from its ubiquity. The one in #2 looks made of gold. I like seeing the close-up views of this kelp. I like the the variety of textures and the colors in the fourth of your wood patterns. Would love to see that one bigger. And more and more bullwhip kelp. I can’t get enough; so happy you can’t either. I like how the setting sun is pointing out the kelp’s translucency in #9. That photo is a real two-fer; the top third could be its own image, as could the bottom two thirds. Amazing that the whole works so well. It’s a lovely photo. Your depth of field in #10, another beauty, is spot on, as usual. I think it takes a keen eye like yours to see the potential in #14; you pulled it off. Thanks for the tour, Lynnβ€”of your winter waterside and your sensibilities.

    Liked by 3 people

    • This kelp is a standout player here – you can’t miss it – but I’m sure you’re right, many people walk right by. The closeup was included intentionally, to see it that way just adds something, I think. I want to get a decent photo of the holdfast but have not succeeded yet. I’m happy that you’re catching kelp fever. Re the wood photo, it’s strange how the bark was partially peeled off that tree. Where it’s caught on the rock there’s daily gouging going on but it’s really hard to photograph – only at a very low tide can you see it, otherwise it’s floating in the water and that water is cold! And that tree is very long/tall but I haven’t been able to capture that yet either. The kelp at sunset was a lucky break – very low tide at sunset, the kelp arrayed so gracefully, all I had to do was get down low. Well, low-ish. The stump in #14 almost glowed because the sun had just gone down. Thank you. And thank you again.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Couldn’t agree more about the bridge–Lovely light.

    The special at my restaurant this week is Braised Lamb Pappardelle so all that bull kelp looks like so much caramelized pasta to me!

    #12 is a feast for the eyes!

    #16 makes me think that the sea has gifted that log with a handful of jewels….

    And I must agree with Linda about #14 as well–something that most folks would have walked right on by…and such a lovely palette of tones.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Wait a minute – are you back in the restaurant business? I don’t think I knew that! Can you express me a portion of that special? I bet I’d be happy with just the sides. πŸ˜‰ As I said to Linda, the sun was just going down when I passed that old stump in #14 and it had a ghostly glow to it that stopped me. πŸ™‚ It’s so good to have you here, Johnny, thank you, have a good week, and don’t work too hard.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Well, I never really left, really. I was forced out due to the pandemic and my wife’s immune system (which became a moot point, since she is also in foodservice and was deemed ‘essential’ [long story] and so, we both stepped back into the fray). The place I am now (and I’m segwaying into the Floor Manager position) is awesome. After 30+ years in the biz, I feel like I’ve finally found home.

        https://www.bigskycafe.net

        (Don’t be confused….there is also a bigskycafe.com in San Luis Obispo…which is super funny since we’re in [a suburb of] Saint Louis…we regularly get folks claiming they made reservations with us, but who really made them at the wrong restaurant….in the wrong state….).

        You have a poet’s eye ( πŸ˜‰ ). An eye for details. An eye for subtleties. An eye for nuance. And eye for ghosts…..?

        Good to be here! (And I will probably always work too hard….just not on yard work or house work! πŸ˜‰ )

        Liked by 1 person

        • It looks wonderful and actually, I’m glad you’re not an owner. What a tough time it’s been for restaurant folks – and for parents! It has to help that you’re in a place that’s trying to do the right thing, in many ways. And the menu looks so good! Thanks for sending the link. I too belong to the club of hard working except around the house humans. Well, we have our priorities. πŸ˜‰

          Liked by 1 person

  10. I’m a little sad to hear of the old pier being dismantled. In November, I was surprised to see it was off-limits, we’ve been walking out on it for a long time. I didn’t realize it was in such poor condition, I guess. And it made me wonder how long it had been cordoned off and I just hadn’t noticed (usually we’re more focused on the meandering walk around Reservation Head). While I don’t have any expressly sentimental attachment to it, for years I’ve looked forward to trying my hand at long exposures from underneath, looking out through the ramshackle bracings. I lost my chance!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I think you may still have a chance if you find a minus tide (or at least a very low tide) during daylight hours. It seems that the structure was weakening and the big November storm really did a number on the supports near the beach. Then we had the series of king tides and windstorms – you’ve surely seen all the driftwood and the eroded trail if you’ve been there recently – and the pier became even more unstable. They’re probably worried about liability so they removed the supports near the beach, making it almost impossible to climb up there.
      I agree, it’s sad that we can’t walk out to the end anymore. I don’t know how much dismantling they plan to do – maybe they’ll leave it as is now that it’s harder for people to get onto it. I’ve done photos underneath but no long exposures – that would be fun and I hope you get the chance. Thanks for commenting – I assume you live nearby?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, I sort of live nearby, in Seattle. So it’s a fairly easy day trip (though living at this distance means it can be logistically much trickier to be there during off-peak times, which I’ve always strongly preferred). Btw L., you probably don’t remember me but this is Jason, we followed each other a long time ago, when you first moved to the PNW! I think we gradually lost touch during the period of a few years when I took several long sabbaticals as it were (the call of parenting duties) from journaling on here. in the intervening time I’ve seen you in the WP reader and continued to enjoy your studies of flora, they are eminently enjoyable to me

        Liked by 1 person

        • We moved here ten years ago yesterday! πŸ™‚ Now I see your blog, which strangely, didn’t come up when I clicked on your icon or blog name. I get it about parenting. I’m going to try to catch up a little now – sorry I dropped the ball when you followed me in December (under a new blog name?). Thanks for clarifying and yes, if you’re not free to drive up against traffic on a weekday it’s hard. Weekends are busier than ever at Bowman & Rosario – the lots fill right up even in winter. Thanks again, it’s great to hear that you’ve been enjoying the posts. What a place we live in!

          Like

        • Does your son still live here? I seem to recall he moved to the PNW, to be closer to you. I’m having a fuzzy recollection that he’d been in the armed forces, am I just whiffing on that? My memory’s not what it used to be.

          Yes, by the way, I did change the name of my journal. It’s been a year or two, I think. It felt like part of an important transition I needed to make, if I was going to keep blogging I wanted to gradually de-emphasize the β€œdad stuff” I tended to gravitate writing to, after all this time. Fast forward to now, I’m not sure how successful I’ve been! Oh well, I still find it fun to share some kind of journal online, I guess that’s the important thing.

          hope you had a good excursion to Bellingham!

          Liked by 1 person

        • You remember far better than I do. Yes, he was in the Marines but had been out over a year when he moved here and he’s still here, currently in the Sammamish area. He loves the PNW. Everyone else is back east. We did what we needed to do in Bellingham…will be there again next week – trying a physical therapist up there.
          Writing and connecting…good things to do under any name. πŸ˜‰

          Like

  11. Hi Lynn, What a beautiful photo essay. Loved your descriptions and the feel of meandering along with you. You really captured fantastic golden light on the bridge along with that reflection. Your kelp series is captivating and I especially loved your hieroglyphics. And the rich colors of your driftwood images. You’ve given us a real sense of place. Delightful.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Nice, a vote for the more abstract kelp photo! You’ve probably seen beds from above. I reduced the clarity a little to emphasize the simplicity of those curves. I should work on that some more though, I think it could be better. One of these days. We’ve had some beautiful sunsets and late afternoon light lately. I can’t imagine a post of just sunsets but I can’t resist making those photographs, either. I think you understand. Thanks for your thoughts, Jane, have a good week!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Gorgeous visual getaway… thanks! As you could probably guess, I’m especially drawn to the textural collage of the images in 5. The second one is especially captivating. It looks so silky and reminds me of patterns I’ve seen in animal fur. I always love seeing how similar patterns are found throughout all different parts of nature.

    Liked by 2 people

    • It’s amazing to see the variety of textures just in wood that’s found on the beaches. The first three are from Kukutali. You should go there someday when you’re up for the drive. A long one, I know – but I was with friends who drove up from West Seattle that day so maybe it’s not so hard. That’s a good point, that we see almost the same textures on completely different beings in nature. THanks, Sheri, glad you enjoyed the getaway.

      Liked by 2 people

  13. That bridge is quite marvelous, best caught at the right time, right place. That major advantage to being there year round. 11-And what a delightful dive into everything I ever wanted to know about kelp… I’m noticed we don’t see quite as much of it down south here.
    Then 5- those marvelous textures and colors.
    15- nice to see a return16- an offering?17- sweet! such a soothing finish.

    Liked by 2 people

    • And the bridge does catch the setting sun regularly. πŸ™‚ Oh, there’s SO much more to know about those Bullwhip kelp…I hope to do a “Just One” post about it eventually. Just teasing you with a few facts, for now, Gunta! πŸ˜‰ I think it wants a particular kind of situation, which might not be as common in your vicinity. This was a good year for it, which is a good sign for many other creatures. #15 is also Deception Pass. Have a good week, Gunta, and thanks for stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. That opening image is a stunner; it’s one that makes me ponder exactly where was the sun and what good fortune for you to be in that spot to capture the dramatic light/dark, as if God were shining a spotlight!

    The hieroglyphics’ patterns made me think of Morse Code written in calligraphy!

    Isn’t it interesting when we really don’t feel like going out – but when we do, there are rewards just waiting to be discovered.
    You, for sure, will find treasures where most people would see little.

    The good thing about the winter is the anticipation of spring… you’ll be out there capturing every nuance of awakening!

    Liked by 2 people

    • It’s good to hear from you amiga, as always! The Deception Pass bridge catches the setting sun often – it’s on the west side of the island, sort of, and so is the place where I walk most often. We’re up here at 48 degrees 44′ N so the winter sun stays low in the sky. It’s really beautiful this time of year. In midsummer when it’s high in the sky you have to wait until almost nighttime to get that gentle color.
      Morse code in calligraphy wow, keep free-associating, Lisa, I love it! Yes, we just need to push ourselves sometimes…and you’re right about the anticipation. The little Rein orchid leaves (like a bog orchid) are just emerging through the mossy ground at the forest edges. They’ll gather light and make food for the show later in July. So it has already begun. I hope all’s well with you! Take care.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. What a fascinating gallery of excellent photos! The first already is striking !
    Eye-catching light and darkness in strong contrast, Lynn brown πŸ˜‰, motion in the middle, great compositions! It’s always a pleasure to come back here! Thanks, Lynn!

    Liked by 2 people

    • At first, I put a different photo at the top then I realized the bridge photo would be the best one to begin with. It’s a dramatic bridge because of the cliffs and how high it is above the water. Then when the sunset shines on it, it’s even better. I appreciate your comment, Petra, thank you! And I’m glad you enjoyed the post. The light has been good lately, as long as the clouds aren’t too thick. πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Wonderful pictures Lynn! The Kelp is fascinating in every form. The Bullwhil Kelp in #9 looks really really giant, incredible! I looked for photos from underwater. So beautiful with the “bulbs” and how well “designed” from nature with the gas in it so it can “stand” in the water. The size of the Sitka spruce trees is amazing too. The coast builds several kinds of giants as it seems – your good climate :-). What I love most here are the structures, especially in #5! I can’t recognize the fungi, but it looks beautiful. The set of 5 pictures alltogether is a very nice constellation! I would put it right onto the wall the way it is. I like 7 and 8, 10, 11, 13, 16. You are absolutely right, it is not so easy to go outside these days, but there is always something to see and enjoy. Thank you for this beautiful walk!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The kelp algae (I want to say plants!) can grow very tall. The one in #9 was arranged perfectly by the water. Yes, the gas – it’s all amazing. And there are many fish and animals that use kelp “forests” to hide in, etc. Trees grow very big here because it doesn’t freeze very often in winter, so they can basically keep growing all year, and we have lots of gentle rain to nourish them. As you said, it’s a good climate, at least for them. Maybe not for cactus. I’m surprised that you said what you love most are the structures…I’m teasing, I have no idea what that is on the bark in #5, and of course I thought of you. I think you made me take that picture. You liked #13, that’s good to hear. πŸ™‚
      You’re here in spirit if not in person. Thank you for reminding me to look carefully at deadwood! πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

      • Great, I wanted to say something likewise about the structures, that you will be surprised, but my brain is too tired for English tonight πŸ˜‰ As usual: great minds think alike, right πŸ™‚
        In our blogposts we often stripe a topic one could do years of studies about like the Kelp for example. It would be nice to know more.
        I’m glad you thought about deadwood – good girl πŸ˜‰
        Have a good weekend with more nice findings!

        Liked by 1 person

        • I’m thinking about doing a “Just One” post about Bullwhip kelp. I haven’t done any of those posts in a very long time – they’re a lot of work because of the research and the images. We can always go deeper, find more information, and get to know a subject better. I just need the time and energy to do it.
          “Good girl”, wow, now you sound like my (German) father! πŸ˜‰
          Maybe you worked all day at the market today – you must be tired! I hope the weather is nice enough for you to go on an outing this weekend…

          Liked by 1 person

        • That is the point: it is a lot of work. I think we both already spent days or hours on a post. But it is nicer to spend time outside instead in front of the computer πŸ™‚
          Weather for a little excursion would be nice. It is stormy again and again, rainy, but a bit warmer. Maybe we will have a few hours of sun tomorrow or at least light, Sunday the next rain is said to come. I have the feeling we have similar weather these days? – Good night or good day to you dear Lynn πŸ™‚

          Liked by 1 person

  17. You create the magic of a waterside winter, inspiration for us all to take the time as view the miracles around us, as you say “day after miraculous day.” Love this. The view of Deception Pass bridge is brilliant, but the one that takes me right along side of the water is the lone figure silhouetted by the sunset view of the Olympic Mountain Range. A perfect way to end what looks to be the perfect day. Beautiful work, Lynn. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • The photograph you mentioned with the Olympics in the background is one that I think would appeal more to people who have spent time here because it evokes what we love about this area – the grand, distant views of mountains that appear from time to time, like good friends. The west-facing views here on Fidalgo island are always nourishing at the end of the day, bringing calm and satisfaction. Thanks for commenting, Randall, and have a good week, wherever you are!

      Like

  18. As usual your photos are very good, I love all of them. The fiurst and the last are …stunning. Nice to see so much water around, here (north Italy) we have no rain since two and half months, very low amount of snow in the mountain which means less snow melting in spring summer. The level of water in the main river is now much lower than what is usually in august, full summer.
    There are concerns for all the agricultural activities. Let’s hope for some rain.
    And not only your pictures are good, but your words as well!

    Liked by 1 person

    • We had a very dry period of a few months last summer and fall and it was depressing. Water is so essential, not just to grow plants but also for our emotional health, it seems. I understand about snow on the mountains – it’s the same thing here – every winter we hope there’s lots of snow up there so we’ll have enough in the rivers later. I do hope you get rain soon! Thank you for the good words about the post, I appreciate it!

      Like

    • Oh, just think of the bushels of seaweed you could collect – but then it’s a state park so I guess not. ;-(
      But you’d surely enjoy the variety of wood, even just on the beaches. It’s pretty amazing. Thanks for stopping by –

      Liked by 1 person

  19. 1. with all the colors here and the ever-changing shape, you need all your senses to take in what’s happening.

    2. the artist’s brush.

    3. just the single drop brings it.

    4. as far as I know, the spider lets a first thread drift in the air until it docks. Thus the geometry of the web is fixed.

    5. the sheet looks solid like a piece of sheet metal.

    6. i like the uniform thickness of the round strings here.

    7.lines and volume

    8.the small stick has a fine structure.

    9.haze comes in from the right

    10.language. At the same time a wonderfully shaped stone.

    11.the bridge I can’t see, but you know it’s there.

    12. wickerwork

    13. this is wonderful. The feathers are obviously hydrophilic.

    Thank you Lynn πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Gerhard. I know these comments belong to the next post but it doesn’t matter. Seeing an artist’s brush in that sand pattern is very cool!
      I agree that in #3 the single raindrop makes the photo work. Our rain tends to be light and drizzly instead of heavy and there are often breaks in the rain so you can go out and find scenes like that one fairly often. That’s interesting about spider webs and it makes sense. πŸ™‚ I enjoyed your comments about lines and volume, structure, etc. I think the little stick with the fine structure that you mentioned was from an evergreen, so all the bumps on the stick are where the needles were.
      It’s nice that you see language in the photo of the stone and sticks on the beach – I do, too. And “wickerwork” – yes, the branches wove themselves, didn’t they?
      Hydrophilic is a good word for that feather. I think I made that photo on the same day I made the one with the single drop hanging from the fern. A wet, uninspiring day that turned out well.
      Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hydrophobic and hydrophilic are very important properties in nature.
        Most leaves are hydrophobic. Hydrophobic leaves repel rain so that the drops roll off the leaf. In this way, they trap dirt particles, which in turn are hydrophilic. In this way, the leaves remain largely clean.

        Sorry for not choosing the right post. πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

        • It’s funny, Almuth and I were just talking about the way many leaves in tropical climates are designed to repel water by having a waxy coating and a shape that allows water to drip off the leaf. Now you have described another aspect I didn’t know about – but it makes sense. I love it – and I suppose the “dirty raindrops” fall onto the ground, where the little bits of dirt add to the soil. Very cool. Thank you.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Denise. It must be my inherently contrary nature that finds beauty in odd places! πŸ˜‰ I can see the top 3 bark closeups printed together like that, good idea. Oh, when will I ever get to printing?
      I hope all’s well with you –

      Liked by 1 person


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