ON and OFF the BOAT

Here is a collection of images made on ferries, on a pier in Anacortes, Washington, and a street near the pier.

1. Seen on Washington State’s Coupeville – Pt. Townsend ferry, 2021. We puzzled over this. Who gets to go? Where does it lead? I mean, “TANK RM NO. 2” isn’t going to hold us all!
2. A ferry safety net and shadow from the same trip.
3. Seen on the ferry to Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, Washington, 2018.

4. Seen on the Coupeville – Pt. Townsend ferry, 2019. It was a fog-filled crossing.

5. Seen on the Coupeville – Pt. Townsend ferry, 2021. Normally there are two ferries on this route; one holds 90 vehicles, the other holds 124 (but no more than 26 commercial vehicles). 1200 passengers can squeeze on but walk-on traffic is usually light. The ride takes about 35 minutes. The ferry may be canceled during extremely low tides and the fare will set you back from $3.60 to $245.00 and up depending on whether it’s just you, walking on and proving you’re over 65, or you driving a very large vehicle.

6. Seen on the historic Pier 1 in Anacortes, 2021. Anacortes is the only urban center on Fidalgo Island, Washington. The 15.53 square mile city (40.22 km) has about 18,000 residents, some of whom are Samish Indian Nation people, a Coast Salish tribe. Coast Salish have lived in the area for at least 14,000 years.
7. Seen on Pier 1 on the same day. Water from these hoses keeps the catch fresh during unloading.
8. Looking up from the deck of the ferry on the Coupeville – Pt. Townsend route, 2021.
9. Seen from the upper deck of the ferry to Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, 2018.

10. Seen at Pier 1, Anacortes, 2021. The 5,500 horsepower Crowley tugboat ‘Protector’ was built in 1996 as a ship assist and escort tug. This tugboat looked clean enough to eat a meal right on the deck.

11. Pier 1, Anacortes, 2021, the following day. ‘Protector’ is gone and a 1930s yacht, ‘Taconite’ has taken its place. The 125-foot yacht is tied up for two days. The ferry behind it is in drydock at Dakota Creek Industries, a large ship building and repair facility based in Anacortes.
12. Seen on the Coupeville – Pt. Townsend ferry, 2021.
13. Seen on the Coupeville – Pt. Townsend ferry, 2021. What a great-looking piece of machinery.
14. A warehouse near Pier 1 in Anacortes, 2021. The crane behind it is part of Dakota Creek’s operation. They are currently contracted to build six US Navy tugs. The tugs will tow and handle Navy carriers, surface ships, submarines and barges

15. One of Dakota Creek Industries’ buildings is graced by a telephone pole shadow, 2021.
16. The Anacortes Arts Festival juried art show, held inside the historic Transit Shed next to Pier 1. 2021.

17. A sculpture at the Anacortes Arts Festival juried art show frames a couple resting on the pier. The ferry in drydock is in the background. 2021.

18. Sunset seen from the Coupeville – Pt. Townsend ferry, 2021.

***


67 comments

  1. Fine set! What I like about ferries; trains(tations) and busstops is that you are in a waiting position. Nothing else to do but wait, until you are picked up; or till you have reached your destiny. You can’t escape. And when you start shooting then; you start with an open mind; ready to shoot what shows up. That often leads to unexpected shots out of the nothingness.. πŸ™‚ I like nr1; nr2 and nr8 a little extra! See you, Lynn!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Wow, Harrie, what a great idea (why didn’t I think of that? πŸ˜‰ ) It’s absolutely true. You can’t walk away, your options are limited and you have to work with what you have. I’ve always appreciated limitations (up to a degree!!). Thank you so much for this comment, it has me thinking. Have a great week!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Your mention of Samish and Salish had me wondering whether those are variants of the same indigenous name, like Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota. One website says “Linguistically and culturally, Samish are part of the Coast Salish, speaking a dialect of Coast Salish known as ‘Straits Salish, rather than a Lushootseed dialect as some of our immediate neighbors to the east.” That still doesn’t directly answer the question.

    Maybe the emergency escape hatch in the top photograph is for our imaginations to escape into.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, that’s a great interpretation of the escape hatch. I’m going to go with it.
      I’ve read basically the same thing you quoted and I too remain puzzled. There are many tribal names and waterway names here that begin with an “S” and end with “ish” so maybe Samish and Salish are unique words but have common sounds that are found frequently in Coast Salish languages.
      Have a great week, Steve!

      Like

    • #8 and #9 have the blues so maybe that plays a part in their appeal. It IS really wonderful to gaze at the water and sky while on a moving ferry.
      What Harrie said above about the confinement in these spaces as you wait to arrive or wait to board is very interesting, too.
      Thanks for commenting, Laura, have a good week.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Lynn, you always seem finding the perfect form distribution for the image plane. I love your sleepwalking security at that, here especially (besonders!☺) to be seen in the more graphic photographs ns.2 to 5 and 7 to 9. Harmony singing in all of them, even in the most technical ones.
    Boats are always the photographers’ friends, aren’t they? Good you live near them and introduce them to us. I very much enjoyed this series, although the trees here only appear very far away or very dryly processed to boat planks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Your comments are intriguing, Ule, and this time I’m not sure what the sleepwalking security refers to – so please enlighten me when you have a minute. I really enjoy finding graphic compositions in unusual places. Harrie (above) had some interesting things to say about taking photographs on ferries or while waiting for them. I think the limitation imposed by the confined space forces one to find interesting things right where you are.
      Yes, boats are great subjects – why is that? They excite the imagination in a different way than a plane or train does. I need to photograph them more often.
      This post began when we went to the Anacortes Arts Festival, a big outdoor event with over 250 artists (most are craftspeople), 3 music stages, and the indoor juried art show in #16. When I go to the festival I’m always more excited by the space where it’s held than by the art. You get to see some of the bigger ships close up during the festival.
      What you said about the trees and wood was so funny! And it’s not just the boat planks but there’s my favorite wood – the heavy wooden planks used to make the floor of the big pier building in #16. When you look down between the old, worn, planks you can see the water below! πŸ™‚
      And I have to add — one of the things we like about this town is that it has not turned into a cute tourist town (not yet anyway). There are still several working maritime industries here. The ship repair and building business is a big one. Next door to the building in #16 is a large rope-making factory that manufactures all the heavy ropes used on boats and ships. I hope these businesses keep going.
      Thank you!

      Like

      • Hi Lynn,
        sleepwalking security refers to the impression that you never seem deciding “unwisely” how to cut your pictures, even not having to think about how to – just do it perfectly as part of your nature.
        Anacortes must be photographers’ paradise not only in landscape issues. Maybe you are working on making it a photo tourists place, be careful not to make it look too tempting πŸ˜‰.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Oh, interesting, and thank you for the compliment…but I do often crop photos in Lightroom and sometimes I fiddle around with the proportions a lot before finding what looks best to me. If I’m really stuck I ask Joe for his opinion!
          My “voice” is too small to turn Anacortes into a photographer’s tourist destination and besides, I don’t post on Instagram. πŸ˜‰ What a thought! We do get a lot of summer people who come on their boats but so far it doesn’t feel like a burden. It’s a small enough number to feel like the summer brings an influx of life after a very quiet winter. Now I have to knock on wood….

          Like

    • Oh, I love that one – I haven’t read it in a long time. She must have been talking about a NY ferry. In her day I think there were a number of them. Did you know there’s a Millay Colony upstate, southeast of Albany? Writers and artists do residencies there. Millay lived there and left the property to her sister Norma, whom my ex-husband got to know years ago when he was helping her with editing (or something). It’s a wonderful place. Great poem, thanks, Steve.

      Like

      • Now that’s a coincidence: I seem to remember that my father once went there and met Millay’s sister.
        Here’s Millay herself reading the poem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYQkEkB_fhk
        I always think it’s the Staten Island ferry, probably because that’s the one I used to ride for a nickel. You’re right, though, that when Millay wrote the poem a century ago various ferries plied the Hudson; the bridge and two tunnels hadn’t been built yet.

        Liked by 1 person

        • We’ll never know what ferry she took but it doesn’t matter, does it? It’s interesting that your father went there – I bet there are more ways you and I have a few degrees of separation, with our time spent upstate. Thanks for the recording – it makes you realize how much diction changes in a relatively short amount of time.

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  4. Nice change of pace, Lynn. I like that first piece: beautiful palette, a perfect semi-abstraction. Number 8: a splendid view of the maritime sky. I’ve been on about a dozen ferries myself since the beginning of the summer. There’s no better way to start a trip. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • A change of pace, exactly. You use the Orient Point ferry a lot – we talked about that – I bet it’s wonderful. You’re right, it’s a great way to begin a trip. Harrie (above) had some interesting things to say about photographing on ferries or while waiting for them. Thanks very much, John, I appreciate it.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Dear Lynn,
    thanks a lot for sharing your pictures. We like especially the graphics of these pictures. We love all kinds of ships. As we live on an island our holidays, business tours etc. always start with using a ship. We like most your pictures 4, 8 and 18.
    All the best, stay well
    The Fab Four of Cley
    πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

      • Dear Lynn,
        we are fascinated by boats. Actually, we don’t have a big harbour here but a busy harbour for private pleasure boats. We have a little dinghy as well.
        Wishing you a wonderful rest of the week
        The Fab Four of Cley
        πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  6. A very fine post Lynn. I think structures and “lines” attract me most here. I love all the graphic photos, especially #3, 12, 15. They show your talent, your eye for the art again. I could imagine all of these 3 in an art gallery as big pictures on the wall. They speak for themselves and your talent to make these simple things to art is fantastic. We talked about it before. The broom and the “wall” in #12 is just perfect in a vivid way πŸ™‚ I also like 2,4,6,8,13,18. 6 is rather tender and poetic πŸ™‚ Interesting are the prices for the ferry and the number of passengers. Wow! It seems to be a big one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! Harrie (above) was saying that being stuck on a ferry, waiting, forces you to open your mind and shoot what you see, which is so true. That mop is very dirty – I don’t think you would see one like that in Germany! πŸ˜‰ I really do like to get to the essence of things, artistically. I agree with you about #6 – it always seems to be a poetic moment when you see a bird’s feather at your feet, right? Yes, these ferries are busy and they need to be big. It was more fun before COVID, when it felt more comfortable to wander around the ferry, but even now, it’s fun. I found the subjects in #5 & #18 right next to our car, on a lower deck with no view except a dirty porthole. But we can always find something interesting, can’t we? Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

      • You find always something interesting and you find it everywhere πŸ™‚ Without Covid a lot was more fun, but we have to make our best of it and you did.
        What I like about the feather is the pattern you find in it and at the same time in the wood too. It corresponds very well.
        Hm, I think you got to know the german mentality very well πŸ˜‰ Like a friend of mine said: some people should lick on the mop or something like that at least once a week πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

        • What you’re talking about with the wood & feather would probably be more obvious if I cropped the photo – honestly, I just like to photograph feathers like that so I did. πŸ™‚ On Wednesday Joe and I found a really pretty feather in the woods that I need to try to identify – you know there’s a feather atlas online for that, right? What’s next?
          The German love of cleanliness is well known in this country, I would say. My father was true to many Germanic qualities – he was raised by two Germans, even if it was in New York! I think they spoke a lot of German around the house. My grandmother grew cabbage in the yard, which embarrassed my father. He had many qualities that I would consider to be classic German traits. We all try to be politically correct these days but let’s face it, some generalizations seem to be true. One of the best things about visiting Germany for me was coming to accept and really appreciate the German side of my heritage – before that, I did not think well of that part of my genetics but now I see the value of those qualities (orderliness, cleanliness, attention to detail, etc.), even if my house is terribly dirty. πŸ™‚
          Happy weekend!

          Liked by 1 person

        • I like the picture with the feather the way it is. No need to crop it. Yes, I once stumbled over this feather site. Fascinating, but you have to search for a while or do you know what to look for? The site must have been a lot of work! I love all these beautiful feathers!

          Hm, I think the German cleanliness is going down, at least in the younger generations πŸ˜‰ But I know areas where it is extreme, oh dear. I remember incidents from 30 years ago I can only laugh about today. Although this way of thinking is politically totally incorrect πŸ˜‰ I am glad you have come to accept this side. There is always something positive – and negative – and both belongs to us. A friend of mine came to the same conclusions while living abroad for more than 15 years. About the cleanliness: I can comfort you: my appartement is terribly dirty too πŸ˜‰ Have a good week!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Penny, yes, the numbers are under the photos. A big red smack! πŸ˜‰ Yesterday while driving into town I heard an interview (on CBC) with the woman whose project under the bridge you photographed for your blog. She was every bit as opaque & confusing as you must have felt after reading the signs for the installation. I had to laugh…but I’m sure the work itself is fun and very worthwhile to see. It would probably be even more fun if you could grasp the augmented reality and blockchain technology concepts behind it. The piece needs a better spokesperson. Come on, Penny, you can do it! πŸ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  7. This is a great theme with so many possibilities as your vision demonstrates! Number 9 is a nice simple design that gives a cool aquatic vibe. Number 10 is an awesome subject. It feels a bit old-fashioned to me even though it was built in ’96. My favorite here though is 12. It looks like it has been there among the rust for who knows how long and I wonder what or who is holding up the end of the handle. Then I like that little peek of orange rope in the corner … it echoes the strands of the mop. It’s an unconventional composition putting the brightest thing in the corner. It works for me and to tell the truth, I was so intrigued with the mop I didn’t notice it right away … it did not call too much of my attention or detract.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That mop is pretty dirty, isn’t it? I found a great composition of two mops on a ferry several years ago so every time I ride a ferry I consider the mops. I didn’t crop the rope out for the reason you noticed but I don’t remember noticing that when I took the photo. I liked the way the bright rope and old mop played against each other – the mop seems to point to it but like you said, it still doesn’t dominate. It’s really fun to find compositions in places like these. Thanks for looking carefully, I really appreciate it.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Love your detail shots, Lynn. The “everyday” shot through your eyes are works of art: the wonderful mop, the standpipe, the hoses, the hatch. And the moments of light and shadow: the telephone pole shadow, the wispy clouds, the shadow of the railing, the net, and the bow with the current. All so thoughtfully composed. I enjoyed your info about the ferry systems, too. Wonderful post. Someday we will get back up there! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • The mop still has some life in it, or at least someone must think so…I was joking with my German friends that I probably wouldn’t find such a dirty one on a German ship. πŸ˜‰ Glad you like the standpipe, too – it’s kind of insect-like, isn’t it? It’s great fun to make photographs on ferries. Harrie (above) was saying that when you’re on a ferry, waiting to get there, you photograph with an open mind because you have to work with what you have. That was a great insight.
      Yes, someday…at least you made it SF! Thanks for stopping by. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  9. #1 chuckling… I don’t suppose you thought of someone trapped inside Tank Rm No. 2? Wondering about perspective of just how skinny would the escapee have to be.Β  Funny how that one shot brings up so many questions!
    I’m imagining we were on one of those ferries.
    #8 There be Dragons? Or is that a friendly poodle?#17 very cool framingOoops looks like Graham jumped to the same thought I did about #2I’ll have to show this to Eric. He once worked on the ferry off Beaver Island.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Graham (above) thought of that, too! As you realized! Great minds…
      I’ll take the friendly poodle… πŸ˜‰ Ferries are always fun to ride and photograph on…may we all have more ferry rides in the future…
      Thanks, Gunta!

      Liked by 1 person


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