STILL PHOTOGRAPHY?

The other day I saw an ad in The New York Review of Books for a book called Theory of the Earth by philosopher Thomas Nail. The title caught my eye, and, as so often happens in the age of the internet, that led me to more books, articles and interviews. Nail writes about human migration, borders, and the philosophy of movement. As someone who has moved house many times and generally enjoys being on the move, I think about movement from time to time, so Nail’s project to reconfigure philosophy from the point of view of movement intrigued me.

If I understand correctly, Nail sees phenomena as matter in motion and time as a process or effect of matter in motion. We live in a universe of change. Our world is not a closed set of discrete things and dates, but rather one of open processes. Humans are not external to life, observing it from afar. Space and time are not “things” as many of us were taught to construe them. Nail claims that not only is matter always in motion, but there is no separate force enacting this continuous flux. Rather, reality simply IS motion: it’s all patterns of interactions.

I’ll admit that a deep dive into Nail’s writing can leave me gasping and confused. Yet, I find inspiration there. In my view, philosophy can touch on every part of our existence, including our enjoyment of images. Thinking philosophically stretches the mind and encourages us to think critically, a practice that promotes creativity, curiosity, and clarity.

Looking at a painting isn’t the passive activity you might suppose. Even the heat emanating from your body transforms the painting, which vibrates waves of photons as it decays in a constant feedback loop with the environment. There is a “vast iceberg of material consequences” to everything we do, including the seemingly passive activity of aesthetic appreciation.

We may call photographs still pictures, but in fact, they are motion itself: the motion of a body acting in space, gathering impressions, and operating a camera; the motion of the camera, the subject being photographed, and a brain thinking, sensing, feeling. A digital photograph involves the motion of a computer as images are modified and light bounces around the screen – and the room! Photographs are light moving through the air, through the camera, on the screen, inside our eyes. Far from being separate, stable objects or mere copies of phenomena, photographs involve fluidity and complexity – more than we imagine.

Doesn’t a photograph also involve the motion of your brain, your breath, your heart? Yes. Mine too.

There is a group of photographs below. They’re here because I chose to bring them together and you are choosing to look. It’s an interactive process. There’s nothing static about it.

*

Pure motion and transformation,

there is nothing still

about still photography. It is material,

real, and

constantly becoming:

Such a delight, this very world

in motion.

*

1. Bullwhip kelp afloat on an incoming tide.
2. Rotating the polarizing filter, I shifted the view. Motion = transformation.

3. Shadows and reflections. Far more than a static representation or an artifact of time, the image is in your brain and you are interacting with it.
4. It can be hard to free oneself from the idea that an image is a fixed thing.
5.
6. The patterns in this rock appear to shimmer but the rock doesn’t have to shimmer to be in motion. There is probably mechanical, chemical and thermal movement even in the seemingly solid rock. And there’s motion in the photograph.
7. Moving the camera as I press the shutter may make it easier to think of a photograph as pure motion.
8.

9.
10. Intentional camera movement again, expressing something poignant in the dynamics of the flower-filled swamp.

11.
12.
13.

14.

***


99 comments

    • Thank you, Sue…he’s written quite a few books but I suspect each one takes lots of patience to wade through if you don’t have a philosophy degree. Listening to an interview with him and reading another interview helped a lot. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Wonderful! A truly great set of images and meditation on a world and universe in motion.
    Seeing the world, life and everything else from a perspective of movement is an interesting way of viewing things. To acknowledge that everything is moving and in a state of flux I’m sure can help us view and understand our world differently. Anything that helps us question everything and stretches our thinking can only help us appreciate how all things are connected and the delicate balance of the natural world. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and those of Mr Nail and the photographs which are a proper treat and cheered me up on a damp and grey morning.
    I remember 2018 I ran a little mini series of photographs based on the Locard’s Exchange Principle! Yes, I know it’s not the subject of many conversations over a cup of coffee! I heard about it (I think in a TV drama!) and subsequently enjoyed reading about it and I was naturally inspired to take some photographs themed around the principle. Here is a link to the images which I think also link in with the theme of your post ๐Ÿ™‚ https://postcardcafe.wordpress.com/?s=Locard+Principle
    Best wishes
    Mr C ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 4 people

    • First, thank you for the link – as you’ll see, I enjoyed it. I think our thinking is very much in harmony – and how nice to know that this cheered you up on a damp, gray morning! Here’s to further exploration into ideas and more enjoyment of the world around us. Have a good weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I like that Thomas Nail inspired you with your camera ๐Ÿ“ท Itโ€™s great to take an idea and run with it, explore it and enjoy the path along which it takes you.
        My current nature series has a while to run and youโ€™ll notice my little eco warrior popping up from time to time. She first appeared a couple of years ago in a few one minute videos with various banners in locations around the city centre. I realised I hadnโ€™t actually taken any still images and thought it would be nice to include her with some environmentally themed placards! I had the idea and ran with it. Iโ€™ve also had some interesting conversations while Iโ€™ve been out taking photographs of with small character figures.
        I think itโ€™s good to see where small moments of inspiration can take us.
        I look forward to seeing where you take us next with your photographsโ€ฆ ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ“ท๐Ÿ˜€

        Liked by 2 people

        • ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for the explanation; I hope the eco warriar banishes all eco-incorrect thinking! ๐Ÿ˜‰
          And thanks for your generous comments…Have a good week!

          Like

  2. Dear Linda,
    thank you VERY much for this interesting post that leads us back to the roots of Western philosophy. Heraclitus’ ฯ€ฮฌฮฝฯ„ฮฑ แฟฅฮตแฟ– (panta rhei) is often quoted, but it seems to go further back to Plato who noticed that everything is in a constant change. You made us curious to read Nail’s book.
    There is an interesting contradiction in every photograpy as it makes time stop and at the same time it makes the onlooker imagine a before and after and is a product of movement.
    We like your series of pictures.
    Your post makes us thinking. Thank you!
    Wishing you a wonderful weekend
    The Fab Four of Cley
    ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 4 people

    • It’s gratifying to know that you enjoyed this foray into philosophy – but of course, you are a philosophical kind of guy, aren’t you? ๐Ÿ˜‰
      Thomas Nail often talks about Lucretius (he’s written books about him). Apparently, Nail reads Lucretius differently than most people, and finds his inspiration in a rereading of Lucretius’ De rerm natura.
      https://euppublishingblog.com/2020/04/07/lucretius-ii-book-extract/
      I like your observation about the contradiction inherent in photographs. Contradictions are good places to wander through sometimes. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Thanks for your comment, Klaus. Have a pleasant weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dear Lynn,
        Oh dear, we were treated at school with Lucretius’ “de rerum natura”. We were that busy translating and understanding the grammar that there was hardly any time for speaking about his ideas.
        Contradictions or polarity are important, without them no movement.
        All the best and thanks for commenting
        The Fab Four of Cley
        ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 3 people

  3. Looking at this again, the book would have me grappling with the concepts! โ€œ Even the heat emanating from your body transforms the painting, which vibrates waves of photons as it decays in a constant feedback loop with the environment. There is a โ€œvast iceberg of material consequencesโ€ to everything we do, including the seemingly passive activity of aesthetic appreciation.โ€ โ€ฆโ€ฆ

    Liked by 4 people

  4. The second Roosevelt came up with the first CCC, the Civilian Conservation Corps, and now you’ve introduced a second one: creativity, curiosity, and clarity.

    You mentioned Thomas Nail’s idea that “reality simply IS motion: itโ€™s all patterns of interactions.” When I was of college age I came up with the idea that patterns ARE reality. In some mysterious and maybe never explainable way, an arrangement of 29 protons, 29 electrons, and 35 neutrons IS copper. A certain range of light vibrations IS red.

    Last year I took a few pictures along the lines (literally and figuratively) of your #3โ€“5 and have kept putting off showing them, as they don’t show what we normally call nature.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I can count on you to think differently, Steve, and your new CCC is a good one! We have structures built by the old CCC just a few minutes from home. It was a wonderful thing, wasn’t it?
      Your idea that patterns are reality is another interesting one. I guess the logical next question is whether you can find patterns everywhere – whether true randomness exists?
      And please show your non-outdoor-nature photos! Good to hear from you – have a good weekend.

      Like

  5. Again, a wonderful article with plenty of food for thoughts and amazing images, Lynn.
    Viewing the world around us from the perspective of movement is an eyeopener. We’ll give this some thought and come back to you, most probably with a link. Excellent work!
    Have a good weekend!

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Beautiful photos. Based on your writing youโ€™re ripe to read about a subject that constantly intrigues meโ€ฆ..quantum mechanics. And there is plenty to read about it from a non-quantitative point of view. I live it and believe me I donโ€™t know math. Turns out reality is far from what most people think.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I don’t think I’m necessarily up to anything but a light read in the area od quantum mechanics. Your coment has me curious about your own experience and how it might be related to your work. I lived in a zen community/monastery for five, transformative years. The teacher there had a background in the most abstract kinds of physics. I think that helped him grasp some of the more difficult concepts in Buddhist thought, which he in turn communicated to his students. So my feeling for some of these ideas comes at least partly from all those years of Buddhist study. Thomas Nail has apparently spent a lot fo time studying physics, etc. as well as philosophy. Thanks for your stimulating comment, Howard!

      Like

  7. Interesting connections to the book and your thoughts on photography, Lynn. Reminds me of the Ansel Adams quote, โ€œThere are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.โ€ Your landscape studies are sublime. Your opening shot flows like a ballet.Your shadow shots are so well seen and your kitchen utensils are wonderful. Also, love the rock patterns close-up and the rocks on the beach. Wishing you a great weekend! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, I think it’s important to keep the interactive nature of what we do in mind, something you certainly do. Thank you for commenting about the images, too – they can get lost in the writing if it deviates from the norm and at least for this blog, this text isn’t typical.
      The first photo was taken from the same vantage as one of a heron balancing on that same bed of kelp – maybe you remember it. The waves of movement through the pass there are always beautiful to watch.

      MID-AUGUST


      I’m glad you like the utensils, too – I asked Joe if that photo seemed not to belong but he was all for it. Great minds….
      Have a great weekend yourself…and thank you.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Wonderful post, and Iโ€™m sure Prof. Nail will be delighted if he runs across it. His philosophy of movement is new to me, and wow how intriguing, as are your photos. Which have always struck me as samples of stories-in-progress, and always suggest all sorts of tales, mysteries and interpretations. Quite often, no matter what the subject – seaweed and pebbles on a beach, vegetation, bits of bark, or glimpses through a greenhouseโ€™s foggy glass โ€“ the photos seem to be of some sort of cryptic message, clues or runes. Sand writing, water writing, shadow writing. And then the suggestions that arise from the photos run through our brains, branching off and transforming, so yes, definitely something live, mutable and in motion. Your intentional movement in #10 certainly is poignant, the flowers streaming away into mist or streaks of light, and it may be a trite expression, but I think โ€œa fleeting momentโ€ is kind of perfect sometimes, for all these fragments of time sailing along, dissolving, and reforming. Kinda neat. My favorite in this album is the second shot, sinuous kelp accented nicely with the little bulbs or floats (I did look up the term and โ€œpneumatocystโ€ is fun but Iโ€™m not gonna use it, a little bit goofy-sounding, donโ€™t you think? And sounds too much like an embarrassing medical condition) And I like your poetry, well done!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you for taking the time to think about what you see and read so thoroughly, Robert. What you say about my photos is like finding a valuable gem, I treasure it. I have often thought of the lines and marks I see in nature as kinds of writing, for example. I enjoyed the way you took off (your mind is always doing that!) from the wetland/skunk cabbage photo. And I’m sure I’ve read that the kelp’s floats are called pneumatocysts but I’d forgotten that. The word totally sounds like a medical condition! For someone who grew up in upstate NY, this area is full of wonders, that being one of them. I know you understand. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Thanks again, Robert, enjoy what’s left of your weekend…or maybe you’re off for a while.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Not surprised you were gasping, this is all a bit heavy for me, though I completely agree with “Humans are not external to life, observing it from afar.” – no, we’re certainly very much a part of Life, and also causing the end of Life for quite a few other species. Good pictures, may favourites are 4 and 9. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    • It’s good to hear from you, Adrian, and yes, your point is well taken. Let’s hope there are enough strong voices and enough will in the younger generations to turn things around before it’s too late.

      Like

  10. Oh my, I’ll now be on the trail of “Theory of the Earth,” though I suspect a deep dive would leave me gasping & I am therefore very grateful for your succinct summary (para 2 above). Absolutely we are in a universe of change, are part of a world of open processes. I agree entirely with your reminder that looking at a painting is not a passive action & that photographs each contain and express many forms of motion. Here you echo (& expand) a point Will Gompertz (former director of the Tate Gallery) made in his 2012 book, “What Are You Looking At?” — namely, that the art lies not in the object but in the interaction of that object with each viewer. I note Howg2211’s reference to quantum mechanics: I wonder if he has read Gary Zukov’s 1979 presentation of the subject for intrigued non-scientists, entitled “The Dancing Wu Li Masters”? Quite rightly it was honoured in the 1980 U.S. National Book Awards, category Science. Once again, you bring us beauty and a great deal to think about.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Check out some of his videos – the “vast iceberg” quote above links to one of them. Thank you for bringing up that book – I haven’t heard of it and I bet I would enjoy it. Yes, interaction is the thing…it’s all about relationships, in more ways than we think. Howard is a cardiologist – he had me wondering exactly how he’s living quantum mechanics. In my reply to him, I mentioned that years of living in a zen community probably primed me for this kind of thinking. I remember that book but never read it, only heard about it.
      Thanks for your thoughtful attention, Penny, I appreciate it! Stay cool!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Nice dive into time and philosophy! It occurred to me that we must have been in synch given the last few photos I just posted… waves in motion are irresistible to me! Utterly in love with your first image!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Do you see Bullwhip kelp growing like that? Maybe in certain places, where the wave action isn’t too intense? They’re beautiful to see, aren’t they? I’m looking forward to your post – will get there soon. Thanks, Gunta, stay cool!

      Like

      • I can’t think of many places along our coast (there must be some, but not that I’m aware of) that are calm enough for the sort of action you captured. On the other hand… there’s the Redfish Rocks Marine Reserve (https://www.redfishrocks.org/the-marine-reserve/) just south of Port Orford which has been protected or restricted for about a decade. I’ve been noticing what appears to be a resurgence of kelp beds as we drive along that area. Oddly enough we drove to Port Orford just yesterday and the ocean was about as calm as I’ve ever seen it. The lighting was fantastic.

        You have to look really closely for the kelp in the last shot from high on the cliffs and a great distance from the kelp… you may be able to see some black specks just past the surf line. I’m certain that has to be kelp floating out there. If I had stopped a bit farther south of this spot, the kelp would have been closer, but the fog and the lighting and the colors of the ocean had me on an entirely different mission. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 2 people

        • I see those black specks in that photo – yes, looks like it. I’m glad to read about the marine reserve – we need more of those, right? The light in your photos does look unusual – there’s a kind of glowing calmness about it. Beautiful. Glad you got to see that – and phtograph it!

          Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Lynn, such a great post! Your experiment of putting philosophy into images has succeeded for me. In motion is everything – even when we think the world is still. It’s a tough idea for someone in love with the idea of staying motionless and quiet sometimes at least.
    For me, these thoughts mean another proof for the fact, that it is impossible to show a reality via photography. There are so many different forms of motion during photographing, processing, watching and the photo itself (you name them), that the output can never be adequate to the input. But it can be something beautiful in its own rights.
    Change is all we are, and steadiness is mere illusion?

    Liked by 3 people

    • I guess as long as we think of our quiet, motionless, still times as relative and not absolute states of being, then we are OK, right? Sometimes we feel quiet and still, and we need that feeling, but in fact, there is still constant motion, which is life. (But I can imagine that, given the changes you have been through lately, steadiness and quietude are very attractive. Right now, you don’t need to be thinking about everything being in motion all the time).
      Yes, there’s no need for a photograph to “copy” reality, it’s something in its own right, and that is enough. But I’m glad that I have this tool when I don’t know the name of a particular plant, and I can photograph it, then I can compare the photo to others and most likely, identify it. That’s much quicker than sketching it, but now that I think of it, if I sketched the mystery plant instead of taking a picture I would learn more about it. And my drawing skills would not get rusty. And I would slow down. Sigh….

      Liked by 1 person

  13. A very philosophical post…that the translator helped a lot!
    Really everything is movement, whether at the macro or micro level. Just think that matter is a set of atoms in motion, constantly attracting and repelling each other. And if everything is matter… everything is movement, even if we don’t have the capacity to perceive it.
    And if energy is also movement of electrons and “friends”… then everything, but everything is in motion… everything interferes with everything!
    Anyway, a huge subject like Life itself…
    Objectively, I believe that the beautiful images associated with the text clearly reflect that everything is moving/has movement, even if apparently stationary.
    Have a nice week!

    Liked by 4 people

    • I’m glad the translator worked well enough – I am always amazed by your grasp of the English language – but philosophy? That’s hard in your first language and it must be impossible in a second language. What you wrote is very similar to what Thomas Nail is saying. He gets into great detail about the way everything “interferes” with everything else, too. It’s interesting, but challenging.
      Thank you so much for taking the time to use a translator, for thinking, and for looking. ๐Ÿ™‚ I’m glad you enjoyed the photos, Dulce.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. “Rather, reality simply IS motion: itโ€™s all patterns of interactions.” This is it for me. Or perhaps I’d call it energy. But still the same thing I think. And lots of motion between me and this set of images. Beautiful and arresting. The least interesting for me are 6, 9, and 11. Love the rest.
    Alison

    Liked by 3 people

  15. I would have to read that book at least 6 times to grok it, Lynn. Way too deep for my simple mind although the theory itself does appear simple. Motion is everything. Everything is motion. Although I don’t understand it entirely either, his theory sounds a bit Einsteinian.
    I may have been confused and stumbling around a bit dazed trying to understand but that first image brought me back to my senses. It is wonderful. I prefer the first to the second polarized view. The kepl is more powerful an element there. I like the non-repetitive repetition of number 12. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 3 people

    • No worries, Steve, there are times when it’s fun to delve into this kind of thing and times when it’s just more than you want to deal with. I see waht you’re saying about the kelp and I feel the same way. I appreciate your observations – yes, the patterns show up better in the first photo. I thought it might be interesting to show them both. As you have seen over the years, I find it hard to winnow the selections down. ๐Ÿ˜‰ I’m happy you like that non-repetitive repetition! Let’s just call it rhythm. Have a good week!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. This is an interesting point of view, that can turn everything upside down what we thought to stand still. I once read an article where it was said that everything is vibrating and sending vibrations, which is not so much different from your explanation. There is movement all the time. Actually I agree with this idea, but then there are moments or pictures that remind me rather of static, althought the interaction is there. Brain-irritations ๐Ÿ™‚ But in general it seems to be true to me: when don’t we move = there is no stillstand.
    You chose an interesting variety of beautiful images. I am a great fan of the kelp! I remember earlier pictures from you.They remind me always of art nouveau, the way you photographed them. I also like the shadow plays. Can’t resist them when I see a good one. 3 is a great mixture and you caught me with #4! Every time I look at it my brain says: no movement, no movement ๐Ÿ˜‰ although I know the movement refers to a different layer. Really, it makes me crazy!
    Further on I like #6,10,13 Very interesting post Lynn, that will keep me thinking from time to time.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you for taking the time to read and think about this, even though it’s in English. I’m impressed! The kelp has an Art nouveau look – that’s a new idea! Interesting. All those curves, right? I agree that #4 has a real feeling of stillness but it seemed to me that it would be good to include that one, to push the point about motion. Sorry I irritated your brain! ๐Ÿ˜‰ But by the way, if you want to listen to an interview (in English, OK) that might make it all sound friendlier, try to link at the quote above about the “vast iceberg.” Thank you, Almuth, have a great day!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Especially the first picture with the sliding kelp reminds me of art nouveau patterns! I love it ๐Ÿ™‚
        I followed the link last time, but missed the podcast – I am wondering what I was looking at ๐Ÿ˜‰ I listened to it yesterday. Very interesting, although I think I miss some things. A written version would be a bit easier for me, but it was okay. Some ideas still sound a bit strange, but it is interesting to look at them.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I don’t think anyone who doesn’t have a degree in philosophy will find it easy to follow everything he says or writes with complete understanding. I don’t grasp all the details but my years of Buddhist studies are helpful – there is some overlap in the ideas, I think. Well, we are done with the record heat – the Pacific northwest had a very severe heatwave, breaking records in many places. Many people, ourselves included, do not have air conditioning and the nights were really awful. It cooled down yesterday and last night was very comfortable, at least it was here. Now we can think and act again. Before, all we could do was drag through the day. ๐Ÿ˜‰

          Liked by 1 person

        • I read about the heatwave today. Up to nearly 50 degrees in Canada??! Unbelievable! How were the temperatures in your place? When I think of what you wrote so far extreme heat is unusual in your area? But these numbers are more than extreme! – Back to thinking, right ๐Ÿ™‚ Please cool down and I hope this was an exception, but what do we know?

          Liked by 1 person

        • I just looked it up – a town called Lytton has been getting the worst of the heat in Canada. They have been setting records every day for the hottest temperature in the entire country of Canada. They were just a little under 50C yesterday – and they are above 50 degrees latitude! They are over 200km northeast of us. Listening to the Vancouver, Canada radio station in my car this morning, I heard that there are a large number of deaths since the weekend, because of the heat. We have no rain in the forecast at all, which makes it tough for the plants and increases fire risk.
          The world is out of balance. It just is. ๐Ÿ˜ฆ

          Liked by 1 person

        • These temperatures are crazy! The problem probably is that it can change in one year from one extreme to the other in the following year, so how do you prepare for it? We had a rainy day today, just a whole! day of rain. The last must have been in winter. And it was real nice steady rain, wonderful. In southern Germany they had severe weather with thunderstorms, floods in the streets, hail. We were lucky so far.
          I wish you rain and as much as possible no fires or no severe fires!!!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! You’re right, more or less. It’s a kind of large marine plant that floats on the water. The photo was taken many miles from the real ocean but it is ocean water. Ocean water travels past the west coast of America, then down a long channel to a place called the Salish Sea. I live on an island in the Salish Sea. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. This collection is a good fit for your text. I find them to be quite dynamic … seagrass undulating on the water, a plant reacting to a breeze, a shadow that changes with the time of day … etc. I know creating photographs is not a static activity from personal experience. For me there is a lot of thinking and movement involved and I’m often tired, mentally and physically after an immersed session.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good point! It’s amazing, how tired we get after just an hour or two of intense photography. I’m continually surprised by that. Thanks for stopping by and spending a little time here, Denise…I hope you’re getting out there regularly, thinking hard and moving around to get the right angle. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      Like

  18. Lovely and intriguing! I’m especially drawn to image 3. and my brain could interact with it for quite some time. Partly because my brain seeks to give ‘real form’ to the light patterns. There’s a, What is it?, What is it doing?, questioning grappling with my mind.
    As a photographer I’m keenly aware of the motion present in capturing images. While shooting, the play of changing light, water or wind patterns, even the flow of life in flora or fauna feels uniquely present. A sense of catching the exquisite and fleeting moment, and then another and another, runs through me. I often shoot several shots of ‘the same thing’, but they’re never quite the same. And then the viewer changes them yet again.
    Inspiring philosophy indeed. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Such a generously thought-out comment, Sheri, I really appreciate it. The curved shapes in #3 look like smoke, don’t they? I liked the way they play against the blind shadows. Should I tell you that it was in the bathroom? ๐Ÿ˜‰ Like, reflections bouncing off the top of the toilet? ๐Ÿ˜‰ Hope you get a laugh from that. But seriously, your observations about motion and photography are intriguing. What you describe is an exquisite way to feel what’s happening with that black box in hand. And then you go that important step further to acknowledge the role of the viewer. ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you for communicating your inspiration! Have a good rest of your week – we may as well enjoy the smokeless, comfortable weather in spite of the parched condition of everything around us, right?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, it’s odd to feel everything so dry, but the weather has been gorgeous. No complaints here!
        I guessed the smoke-like ripples were water reflections, but I didn’t guess from the toliet. :D. I too thought of smoke, and part of my intrigue is that it was light not dark, like smoke might often appear.
        Nice to hear my description of inspiration and process intrigued you. Sometimes on a shoot I feel enraptured, and it’s hard to pull myself away. I often lose track of time when involved with a subject – especially if there’s an active play of light on it, like water reflections.

        Like

  19. A new book for my list, thank you for that! I remember being taught that time would not exist without motion and I think of it now and then but I think I’ll have to explore it more having read this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s great, it’s always good to share books and interests. These concepts are really hard to wrap your head around, but once in a while it’s worth trying. Enjoy the rest of your weekend and thanks for stopping by.

      Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s